Connect with us

Drone

US Air Force Aims to Recruit Drone Racers

Published

on

U.S. Air Force Recruits Drone Racers

The US Air Force is looking for ways to boost recruiting numbers, and they may have stumbled upon their next generation of veterans: drone racers! The US Air Force has partnered with a professional drone-racing league. The hope is that a percentage of the drone-racing league’s fan base, who tend to be highly educated and tech-savvy, will join the military and put their skills to the test in technical roles.

During the Drone Racing League’s 2023-2024 season, the pilot and flight deck is decked out in Air Force regalia. The Air Force also held a STEM day where the pilots of tomorrow can learn about all of the different roles in the Air Force and get a behind-the-scenes look at piloting.

As Air Force roles become more and more technical, there’s a growing need to get the next generation excited about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The goal is to show the practical aspects of these skills not only in drone racing but in many jobs in the military. 

Air Force Forced to Try New Approaches to Recruiting

The US military continues to struggle to find the next generation of warriors who will serve and protect the nation. In 2022, the Army came up 15,000 soldiers short in its annual recruitment drive. The Air Force is doing even worse and is expected to miss its quota for 2023 by over 10%.

The poor recruiting environment is caused by multiple factors, including declining levels of nationalism, a lack of Americans who can pass the medical and fitness tests, and the military struggling to match the salaries offered by the private market. There are also concerns about the morality of US military operations, with many people unwilling to participate in combat, which is deemed unnecessary and destabilizing to the world.

Despite the challenges facing the US Air Force, Brig. Gen. Christopher Amrhein, the Commander of the Air Force Recruiting Service, is extremely excited about the partnership with the Drone Racing League. He believes that the Drone Racing League represents the ideal talent pool to draw from. He said participants and viewers of drone racing are “high-energy tech-setters who have a passion for flight, innovation, and technology.” The US Air Force is hoping to find the next Top Gun pilots at these events!

What Is the Drone Racing League All About?

The Drone Racing League appeals primarily to 16 to 34-year-olds who are very tech-savvy and a bit on the geeky side. This demographic tends not to be interested in conventional sports like the NBA and NFL. However, that doesn’t mean they aren’t competitive or love competition. It just needs to be expressed in more technical realms like gaming and simulation-type events. 

The beauty of the Drone Racing League is its simplicity. An operator takes control of his or her drone and, via first-person view, must race the drone through an obstacle course. The operator who records the fastest time is the winner! 

The Drone Racing League is growing year after year and has taken its events to stadiums all over the world. It also holds simulator events, which is an ultra-realistic video game.

The DRL Simulator game is also sponsored by the Air Force. Within the game, there are special Air Force worktops where you can create your epic drone. There are also Air Force-themed maps, including an abandoned airport which you need to race around. During nighttime, this map will really challenge your flying skills! 

The Air Force appears to know its audience, with over 80% of viewers approving of the Air Force sponsoring the league. Due to the popularity of the league, the Air Force has got its brand in front of almost 300 million viewers. 

The US Air Force has an ever-growing demand for engineers and remote pilots as they incorporate more and more drone technology into their operations. The Drone Racing League fans already possess the exact skills the Air Force is looking for, notably engineering, innovation, and tech. However, the US Air Force is competing against private drone companies, this market has also exploded and is expected to be worth almost $40 billion by 2027. So, if the US Air Force wants to recruit the best remote pilots and engineers, they’ve got their work cut out for them! 

Sport Enthusiast, Builder of brands, and proud founder of Machina Sports, dedicated to pioneering the fusion of human athleticism with cutting-edge technology. Committed to creating a global platform and brand that celebrates the excitement and innovation inherent in Machina Sports while engaging a diverse community of enthusiasts and athletes worldwide.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Drone

Georgia Tech’s Pilots Win Bronze at Collegiate Drone Racing Championship

Published

on

Drone racing Championship

The RotorJackets from Georgia Tech were gunning for a three-peat at the Collegiate Drone Racing Championship after winning the event in 2022 and 2023. Unfortunately, they just fell short this year and had to settle for third place.
The competition was fierce at the 2024 Collegiate Drone Racing Championship, with over 60 pilots from 16 universities across the country taking part. The competition continues to grow year after year as the sport has exploded in popularity. There are now multiple pro leagues, and the top pilots are pulling six figures.

The RotorJackets Are in a Rebuilding Phase

The RotorJackets were established in 2020 and immediately had success on the drone racing scene. However, all of the original members have graduated, and the club is working overtime to recruit and train the next generation of Georgia Tech ace pilots.
The head of the RotorJackets, Ian Boraks, said he couldn’t be prouder of the team. He says the club has shown that it can successfully replace top talent and has the structure and training program in place to ensure the club can continue competing at the highest level.
The RotorJackets have some lofty goals. They want to teach others how to build, design, and fly their drones. At the same time, their racing team wants to win competitions on the international stage. We could see a professional RotorJackets squad tearing up the Drone Racing League (DRL) in the future!

The Collegiate Drone Racing Championship Was Held at Purdue University

The Collegiate Drone Racing Championship is held annually at Purdue University, where drones whizz around IM Fields at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour. The first competition took place in 2017 and featured 48 pilots. The competition has grown radically over the last seven years.
The 2024 Collegiate Drone Racing Championship took place over two days from April 13 to April 14, and 64 pilots competed. The first-person view (FPV) race saw the pilots throw on their goggles and expertly navigate their drones through the different gates. The pilots showed an incredible ability to remain in control of their drones as they flew around the course at breakneck speed.
Ultimately, the 2024 Collegiate Drone Racing Championship was won by Virginia Tech. Oregon State University came second, and rounding out the top three was Georgia Tech. Oregon State came out of nowhere, 2024 was the first time the team had made it onto the podium. Nobody, including Georgia Tech, was expecting them to place so highly.
The RotorJackets have been participating since 2020, including first-place finishes in 2022 and 2023. The club continues to recruit new sponsors and members and now boasts 30 pilots. The team regularly travels to competitions throughout the East Coast.
The RotorJackets have formed a close relationship with the Federal Aviation Administration, Georgia Tech Police Department, and the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering. The team practices almost daily, flying their drones over Stamps Field. They’ve recently secured permission to host competitions on the field, which they hope will get even more people to join the RotorJackets.

Drone Racing Is the Sport of the Future

eSports went mainstream around 2018, and now it’s time for drone racing to hit the big leagues. The sport is starting to get mainstream media coverage, and social media clips are racking up millions of views. There are now numerous professional leagues, and races are being held in sold-out stadiums.
Drone racing combines humans’ love of speed with the latest technology to create a captivating next-generation sport. The RotorJackets’ president describes drone racing as 3D Formula 1 racing. Just like F-1 racing, drone racing is lightning-quick, with drones exceeding 100 miles per hour, and features high-speed braking and G-forces.
This innovative motorsport is packed with non-stop action, and there’s never a dull moment. Also, unlike other racing sports, drone racing is far more accessible. You can purchase a drone and goggles for a few hundred bucks and, within a couple of months, be participating in competitions.
The RotorJackets are training hard and have their eyes firmly on regaining their Collegiate Drone Racing Championship title. The team is planning on bringing a stacked squad to the 2025 Championship. They’ll have to be at their best if they’re going to take out the in-form Virginia Tech!
Read more: Robot Dogs, Drones, and Racing Cars Reign Supreme Inside D-ITET Centre

Continue Reading

Drone

From Passion to Full Time career — how Thomas Bitmatta changed his life — and so can you

Published

on

Changing Passion in a lucrative career

Thumbnail from YouTube interview with Thomas

There’s a moment in life when you stand at the edge of a decision. 

Before you, lies the comfortable, the known. Behind you, the whisper of what could be beckons — a call to adventure that won’t silence. For Thomas Bitmatta, known in the drone racing skies as BMS Thomas, that moment wasn’t just a fleeting thought. It was a crossroads. And his choice? To leap.

Thomas’s story isn’t one of overnight success or serendipitous luck. 

No. 

It’s a narrative hewn from the bedrock of passion, a relentless pursuit of mastery in the fast world of FPV (First-Person View) drone racing. In the grand scheme of life’s pursuits, Thomas chose a path less taken, and it has made all the difference.

The Ascent Begins

Imagine, for a moment, a hobby. 

Now watch as that hobby turns into an obsession, that obsession into a calling. This is the genesis of BMS Thomas’s journey from an intrigued enthusiast dabbling in drone flights to becoming a beloved icon in the global drone racing community.

“Today, I bring you the story of a dreamer who dared to chase his dreams across the skies.”

Thomas’s story began quietly in Australia, sparked by a simple YouTube video. 

Fast forward through years of tinkering, learning, and countless flights, and you find the moment where hobby crossed into destiny. Thomas didn’t just enter the world of drone racing; he redefined his life’s trajectory with a racing drone’s throttle.

Racing Against the Wind

In conversation, Thomas shared insights of his early days, reminiscing about the makeshift races in Melbourne, the allure of the Japan drone league, and his subsequent ascension to international fame. Each race, each flight was more than competition; it was a chapter in his ongoing tale of self-discovery and perseverance.

“It’s more than just flying,” Thomas reflected. “It’s about pushing boundaries, both the drones and my own.”

His journey highlights not merely the evolution of a racer but the transformation of a life through passion. Amidst talks of tracks, technicalities, and tournaments, there’s a subtle yet profound message: dedication, coupled with a love for one’s craft, can elevate the ordinary to the extraordinary.

Navigating Through Turbulence

Yet, the path was not free of challenges. In his chase for passion, Thomas navigated through rough moments — balancing the demands of competitive racing with the rigours of building a career. Sponsorships didn’t come easy, nor did the recognition. It demanded more than skill; it required visibility, influence, and a deep-seated belief in the value of his pursuit.

“And then, something clicked. The right place, the right time, and suddenly, the support came.”

Thomas’s narrative serves as a beacon for anyone standing on the brink of pursuing their dream. It’s a testament to the truth that success, in any field, is a concoction of passion, persistence, and a willingness to forge ahead despite the odds.

Can you do it as well?

Today, BMS Thomas continues to race, not just as a competitor but as an inspiration. His journey tells us that to follow one’s passion is not to walk a path free of obstacles, but to navigate through storms, propelled by the heart.

“If there’s anything my journey has taught me,” Thomas said, “it’s that dreams are not just fleeting whims. They are the seeds of our future.”

See, life, much like drone racing, is not about the fear of falling. It’s about the thrill of flight, the pursuit of passions, and the unwavering courage to chase the horizon, no matter where it leads.

And so, to anyone teetering on the edge of decision, remember BMS Thomas. Remember that when passion takes flight, the sky’s not the limit — it’s just the beginning.

Watch the full interview with Thomas here

Continue Reading

Drone

What Makes Killian Rousseau Such a Dominant Drone Pilot?

Published

on

Drone Racing Pilot

Killian Rousseau, hailing from France, has been ripping up drone racing competitions since he was just 14 years old. The French ace pilot became the 2018 FAI Drone Racing World Cup champion as a teenager!

In 2023, Rousseau once again won the FAI Drone Racing World Cup. The young pilot was in a close back-and-forth battle with Pawel Laszczak. In all six races, Rousseau managed to climb onto the podium, racking up three wins, two silvers, and a bronze. This level of consistency ensured he added another title to his already impressive collection.

In a recent interview, the world champion shared his secrets and what it takes to become a professional pilot.

Rousseau Trains Everday!

The French pilot has put all other things on the back burner and has committed 100% of his efforts towards racing. He spends every day on the simulator fine-tuning his motor skills and perfecting his strategy. Then, every two days, he pilots actual drones.

Rousseau is extremely keen to defend his world title. He’ll be traveling and competing full-time throughout the season. He’s keen to avenge his poor performance at the last World Championships, where he finished 18th.

Another event you’re likely to see Rousseau compete in is The World Games in 2025 in Chengdu. He considers this event to be particularly tough and an honor to be invited. Rousseau is hoping to repeat his 2022 World Games performance, in which he took gold.

French Pilot Looks for New Ways to Make Money From Drone Racing

Rousseau has recently finished studying commerce and can now dedicate even more time to drone racing, which is a scary thought for his opponents. Traveling to different competitions and daily training takes up a huge amount of the 20-year-old’s time.

As prize pools for drone racing are still modest, Rousseau has decided to boost his income by starting his own drone filming company. However, his first love and main focus remains drone racing.

The French drone maestro can’t get enough of the feeling of beating other talented pilots on beautiful tracks around the world. Even though traveling can get tiring, he loves exploring new places with his fellow pilots.

Simulator and Never Quit Attitude Is Key to Rousseau’s Success

Rousseau first started drone racing when he was just 12 years old, back in 2017. Since then, he hasn’t taken any time off. He’s incredibly diligent when it comes to training and is constantly looking over his shoulder at the next generation of pilots.

He says the race meta is changing radically from year to year, so it’s a never-ending battle to stay ahead of other competitors. He has to dedicate a huge amount of time to practice.

Rousseau credits purchasing a simulator with allowing him to continue to improve. He spends hours everyday, often practing into the early morning, pumping out lap after lap. F1 champion Max Verstappen is also known for his love of simulators.

Before and after every race, Rousseau will hop on the simular and race over and over again. He’s gained so much experience over the years that racing has become second nature to him. He demands perfection from himself, repeatedly tweaking his strategy and chasing consistency.

Rousseau Shares Advice for Up-and-coming Drone Pilots

Even though Rousseau has managed to become a full-time professional drone pilot, he doesn’t recommend others to follow his path. He believes young pilots should still focus on school and work and make sure they’re racing because they love the sport instead of trying to make a career.

Rousseau said what helped him the most was meeting experienced drone pilots and flying with them. He also emphasized the importance of competing as much as possible. Finally, he said there are a lot of ups and downs in drone racing, so it’s incredibly important that you never quit until you finally succeed.

The 2024 FAI World Drone Championships will take place in China from Thursday, October 31, to Sunday, November 3, 2024. The event will be held in Hangzhou at the Shangcheng District Sports Center. Tune in to see if Rousseau can take out defending champion MinChan Kim. It’s set to be a battle between the two ace pilots!

Read more: FPV Drone Racing Explained

Continue Reading

Trending